Are There any Environmental Factors Related to the Flu?

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Whenever we get sick, we tend to blame the weather or the lifestyle we have. In the case of the flu, many people would usually associate it with season. However, the flu in general has various factors. Although the number of flu cases rises during the winter, it is not indicative that the flu is seasonal.

According to Scripps Institution of Oceanography, “influenza outbreaks equally affect those living in warm, tropical regions where there is no direct link to seasonal temperature changes.” This means that even people who live in tropical countries where there is no winter are also vulnerable to the flu.

Research

In the research conducted by University of California San Diego, findings show that humidity is the common environmental driver that links the flu to outbreaks around the world. The study is based on 20-year data of global influenza taken from the Global Atlas of the World Health Organization. This data reveals the relationship between the temperature across all latitudes and the occurrences of flu outbreaks.

In the study, it is found that the critical temperature for the flu outbreak is about 70 to 75 degrees. The above temperature doesn’t directly trigger a flu outbreak, but this is the threshold to watch out for because the humidity below, and above such a level is what triggers viral development.

Who is Susceptible to Flu?

People in population-dense areas are susceptible to the flu. According to American Society for Microbiology, “crowding has therefore been implicated as a risk factor for a wide range of viral and bacterial diseases, including influenza.” The reason for this is that the aerosol particles of the virus can easily spread and transmitted from one person to another.

When it comes to age, nobody is exempt. Both children and adults are vulnerable to the flu depending upon the environment. Children in tropical countries are more affected than children in countries with four seasons. This is because the humidity level in tropical countries is higher.

Pregnant women are more likely to suffer from the flu, especially in their second and third trimester. Obese people with a body mass index of around 40 are also vulnerable.

Relationship Between Humidity and the Flu Outbreak

The findings in the study sponsored by Scripps suggest that heat promotes the spread of the flu virus. This points towards the fact that air droplets from the flu virus can hardly spread since the low-temperature make such droplets thicker and heavier while it can freely move from one host to another during warm weather.

Moreover, the flu virus is contained at a very low temperature while it grows faster at around 70 to 75 degrees. In other words, humidity is the perfect condition that develops the flu virus.

Treatment

There are different medicines doctors may prescribe depending upon the type and severity of the flu. It is best to consult your doctor if related symptoms persists. Meanwhile, it is recommended to place dehumidifiers or air conditioners in your room to reduce the risk of the flu. This will temporarily contain the spread of virus.

Alongside, you should eat food that is rich in antioxidants to enhance your immune system and protect your body from diseases such as the flu.

Conclusion

Environment is a big factor in the spread of the flu virus. It is best to prevent the flu than to cure it. To do so, always make sure that your environment is well ventilated. A clean environment also helps prevent such disease. Otherwise, keep yourself hydrated all the time. This will protect your body from the flu.

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Are There Any Environmental Factors That are Related to the Flu?

Whenever we get sick, we tend to blame the weather or the lifestyle we have. In the case of the flu, many people would usually associate it with season. However, the flu in general has various factors. Although the number of flu cases rises during the winter, it is not indicative that the flu is seasonal.

According to Scripps Institution of Oceanography, “influenza outbreaks equally affect those living in warm, tropical regions where there is no direct link to seasonal temperature changes.” This means that even people who live in tropical countries where there is no winter are also vulnerable to the flu.

Research

In the research conducted by University of California San Diego, findings show that humidity is the common environmental driver that links the flu to outbreaks around the world. The study is based on 20-year data of global influenza taken from the Global Atlas of the World Health Organization. This data reveals the relationship between the temperature across all latitudes and the occurrences of flu outbreaks.

In the study, it is found that the critical temperature for the flu outbreak is about 70 to 75 degrees. The above temperature doesn’t directly trigger a flu outbreak, but this is the threshold to watch out for because the humidity below, and above such a level is what triggers viral development.

Who is Susceptible to Flu?

People in population-dense areas are susceptible to the flu. According to American Society for Microbiology, “crowding has therefore been implicated as a risk factor for a wide range of viral and bacterial diseases, including influenza.” The reason for this is that the aerosol particles of the virus can easily spread and transmitted from one person to another.

When it comes to age, nobody is exempt. Both children and adults are vulnerable to the flu depending upon the environment. Children in tropical countries are more affected than children in countries with four seasons. This is because the humidity level in tropical countries is higher.

Pregnant women are more likely to suffer from the flu, especially in their second and third trimester. Obese people with a body mass index of around 40 are also vulnerable.

Relationship Between Humidity and the Flu Outbreak

The findings in the study sponsored by Scripps suggest that heat promotes the spread of the flu virus. This points towards the fact that air droplets from the flu virus can hardly spread since the low-temperature make such droplets thicker and heavier while it can freely move from one host to another during warm weather.

Moreover, the flu virus is contained at a very low temperature while it grows faster at around 70 to 75 degrees. In other words, humidity is the perfect condition that develops the flu virus.

Treatment

There are different medicines doctors may prescribe depending upon the type and severity of the flu. It is best to consult your doctor if related symptoms persists. Meanwhile, it is recommended to place dehumidifiers or air conditioners in your room to reduce the risk of the flu. This will temporarily contain the spread of virus.

Alongside, you should eat food that is rich in antioxidants to enhance your immune system and protect your body from diseases such as the flu.

Conclusion

Environment is a big factor in the spread of the flu virus. It is best to prevent the flu than to cure it. To do so, always make sure that your environment is well ventilated. A clean environment also helps prevent such disease. Otherwise, keep yourself hydrated all the time. This will protect your body from the flu.

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How to Reduce The Spread of Germs

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Germs Everywhere

There are going to be more germs around public areas; that’s just a fact. More people living more diverse lifestyles means more germs. The more germs there are, the more sickness there is. There’s a reason airports and bus-stations seem to be over-run with people coughing, hacking, and sneezing: sickness abounds in public places.

If you understand what you’re getting into, you can avoid sickness with relative ease; but it does mean being conscientious. Following are some public hygiene tips and tricks to help you remain relatively germ free as perpetually as possible.

Wear Gloves In Public

Thankfully for glove enthusiasts everywhere, in wintertime, it is usually cold enough that wearing such things is more comfortable than refraining. It’s not a bad idea to have a nice pair of gloves for regular daily interactions with people. This can be easier than constantly thinking “don’t touch your face, don’t touch your face, don’t touch your face,” after shaking hands with a stranger. Also, you may forget to wash your hands, and catch a nasty germ that way.

In China, between pollution and publicly transmitted diseases, there’s ample reason to wear masks like doctors and dentists do in the operating theatre. The reason they wear those masks is to protect themselves from germs that may come from the patient, and to protect the patient from germs that may come from them. If you live in a dense urban center and must regularly get among people who you see aren’t in the best of health, wearing such a mask may not be a bad idea.

Generally, though, being conscientious about washing your hands, avoiding others when you cough and ensuring that you remain out of the path of those with a sore throat is a great way to reduce the spread of contagions.

Shower Regularly

You’re going to get things on your body that you didn’t realize were there. Showering on a daily basis can definitely help your body remain clean of germs.

Increase The Strength of Your Own Immune System

Eating healthy and exercising regularly increase the health of your own immune system, which in turn helps you to ward off germs. As you ward off germs, you remain healthy, and they die; meaning you can literally be the last stop on the influenza train. The flu gets to you, and can get no further. By being healthy, you can actually help others keep from getting sick, simply because you aren’t as liable to transmit a dead disease. That said, some people are definitely carriers; that’s where the term “typhoid Mary” comes from. They aren’t susceptible to sickness, though it can live in and on them for some reason. So be sure you’re remaining clean and sensitive to the varying health conditions of others.

Avoid High-Risk Areas

Surrogate parks for shopping centers. Watch Netflix instead of going to the movies–at least during flu season. Any areas where people are packed in like sardines are necessarily going to be breeding grounds for germs of various kinds. You’re in a difficult spot if you work in a public office. In such scenarios, it makes sense to keep hand-sanitizer on your desk. Not antibacterial solutions, just the stuff with the gelled alcohol. The antibacterial sanitizer is making people susceptible to super-bugs, and also uses some pretty toxic chemicals.

Staying Germ-Free

Germ evasion protocols include:

  • Being Conscientious About Public Hygiene
  • Showering Regularly
  • Eating Healthy/Exercising To Increase Immune System Health
  • Avoiding High-Risk Areas

Ensure that you be mindful of your public interactions. If you protect yourself, you’ll help to protect others against sickness.

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What are the Different Types of Flu?

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The flu is caused by 3 types of RNA viruses: influenza types A, C, and B. This disease is often called the flu and is generally caused by two viruses: A and B. They are transmitted by close contact with infected animals or via aerosols from infected individuals. Subtypes of influenza B and A viruses can be further divided into strains. There is a wide range of influenza A subtypes as well as influenza B virus strains. New strains of influenza virus can appear and replace the older versions. Such new viruses have antigenic variations referred to as antigenic shift and drift.

Influenza A

Viruses under influenza A are known to infect pigs, people, horses, seals, whales, birds, and many other animals. Wild birds usually represent the natural hosts for influenza A viruses. The virions of this virus comprise of 3 membrane proteins: NA, M2, and HA. Moreover, they also contain a ribonucleoprotein core – with eight viral RNA segments and 3 proteins (PB2, PA, and PB1); a matrix protein that is underneath the lipid bilayer; and the NEP protein. Influenza A viruses can be split into subtypes based on 2 membrane proteins on the virus’ surface: NA and HA. There are 11 different NA subtypes (NA1 to NA11) and 18 different HA subtypes (HA1 to HA18).

Although many different combinations of NA and HA proteins are possible, only a few influenza A subtypes are in circulation among people – H1N1 and H1N2. More subtype combinations can be found in different animal species. For instance, H3N8 shows illness in seals and dogs and H7N7 elicits the disease in horses. Subtypes of this virus are named by combining their NA and HA surface proteins. H3N8 has NA8 and HA3 surface proteins while H5N1 has NA 1 and HA 5 proteins.

Influenza B

These viruses are responsible a similar spectrum of disease as influenza A. Influenza B viruses, however, do not result in pandemics. This is because the virus has a limited host range – humans and seals; this limits the emergence of new strains through re-assortment. Moreover, influenza B viruses are not divided into subtypes; they are broken down into strains and lineages. The influenza B viruses that are currently in circulation include B/Yamagata and B/Victoria. The virions of influenza B contain four proteins: NB, BM2, NA, and HA. The BM2 protein is necessary for the process of uncoating. The NB protein, on the other hand, is an ion channel. Therefore, it is not required for cell culture viral replication.

Influenza B is responsible for significant illnesses. In 2008, approximately 1/3 of lab-confirmed cases of the flu were caused by influenza B. for this reason, the seasonal flu shot contains a component of influenza B.

Influenza C

The enveloped virions of influenza C virus have hexagonal structures. Additionally, they create stretched cordlike structures when they sprout from the cell. What is this virus comprised of? It has four proteins and viral RNA. M1 protein is just beneath the membrane and CM2, which is an ion channel. Influenza C does not have separate NA and HA proteins but their function is merged in a protein called HEF. This means that its virion has 7 RNA segments instead of 8.

Influenza C infections usually result in a mild respiratory illness, which can be compared to other respiratory viruses. This virus does not result in epidemics. According to certain studies, almost all adults have been infected with this virus. Vaccines against this influenza type are not available and lower respiratory tract complications are uncommon.

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Preparing your Child for School This Fall

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Each year the thought of a new school year makes children grumble but parents everywhere tend to rejoice at a new routine. Whether your child is going into kindergarten for the first time ever or your child is embarking on a new adventure to high school, there is preparation that includes buying new school supplies, getting a new schedule and going clothes shopping. However, there are other things to consider with your child going back into a highly populated school where germs and illness often run rampant after just a couple of weeks. There are ways that you can prepare your child for school to help them stay healthy and safe all school year long. This will allow them to focus on what is most important about school and that is learning and growing as a student and person.

The Flu Shot

Depending on where you live in the United States, you may get the flu in your area at different points than other places in the country. Regardless, the cold and dry weather is usually what allows this virus to run rampant in your area and schools tend to be one of the more popular places for children to get sick. You have a lot of children in one classroom and even more children stopping in and out of bathrooms and cafeterias. No matter how well your child washes their hands or pays attention to what is going on around them, there are flu germs everywhere. So much so that when the flu really takes over a school, administrators have many times decided to shut schools down to let staff clean thoroughly and let children get healthy again. One way you can prepare for the school year is to obtain a flu shot for your child. You can have this done at your pediatrician’s office or somewhere else like your local pharmacy. This vaccine is designed to give your child the immunity they need in case they come into contact with someone or something that is currently infected with the dangerous influenza virus.

Recommended Vaccinations

Depending on what state that you live in, there is a set schedule of recommended vaccines children should receive before they enter the school system. Unless your child has a medical or religious exemption from their doctor, your child must get these vaccines prior to starting school. The exact same concept and benefits as the flu shot, vaccines that focus on diseases and illnesses like polio, measles, mumps and rubella will keep these illnesses at bay and keep your child safe as well as other children that are part of the school system. Your child’s school will ask for a signed report from your child’s doctor that details all of the shots your child has gotten up until this point.

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How the Flu Vaccine Helps Reduce Risk in Diabetics

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Flu season goes from October until May each year. The flu virus is very contagious. It can be passed through the air and also on surfaces. Because it is so easy to catch and pass the flu to others, it is important to be vaccinated. While getting the flu vaccine is a good precaution for most, it is absolutely necessary for other people. People of certain ages or with certain conditions can develop very dangerous complications if they have the flu. One condition is diabetes.

How the Flu Shot Can Protect Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

  • Protects the Heart: People who suffer from type 2 diabetes can get an added benefit when they get the flu vaccine. They will have a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. It is important for people with diabetes to stop smoking, keep their weight down, keep their blood pressure down, and get a flu shot to protect their hearts. A recent study has shown that people with type 2 diabetes who have had their flu shots have a 30 percent less chance of having a stroke. They also reduce their risk of heart failure by 22 percent. Also, they have a 24 percent lower risk of dying from any type of heart complication. Finally, the risk of a person with type 2 diabetes who gets their flu shot having a heart attack is statistically insignificant.
  • Protects from Pneumonia: People who have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing pneumonia from the flu. This can land the patient in the hospital for several days and even weeks. When they are protected from the flu, the chances of them developing pneumonia is greatly reduced.

Types of Flu Shots

When a person with type 2 diabetes gets a flu shot, they have a few option. A standard needle injection flu shot is good for anyone under the age of 65. If a person is over 65, they should consider a high dose flu shot. Due to their age, they need more than the typical dose. People under the age of 65 can also get the Flu-Mist flu shot. There are no needles involved with this shot, the actual vaccine is inhaled through the nose. Many doctors prefer that patients who have diabetes get the tradition or the high dose flu vaccine. This is because the safety of the Flu-Mist for these people has not yet been established.

Can the Flu Shot Make a Diabetic Sick?

Many people choose not to get the flu shot because they worry that it can cause the flu. This is not the case. With the traditional or high dose flu shot, there is no active virus in the vaccine. Some diabetics who get the shot will suffer from mild side effects, such as a low-grade fever, muscle aches, and a runny nose. The Flu-Mist vaccine does contain a small amount of the flu virus, however, it is not enough to cause them to develop the flu. Like the traditional and high dose vaccine, it can result in very mild side effects.

Take Regular Precautions

While it is important for a person with diabetes to get the flu vaccine, they should take everyday precautions as well. These include:

  • Avoid close contact with anyone who is sick
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces around the house and at work

The flu can lead to serious complication for people with type 2 diabetes. It is important that diabetics get the flu vaccine and take the necessary precautions to keep from contracting the disease.

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How to Spot Early Signs of the Flu

Sick woman blowing her nose

The flu is a respiratory illness that most often occurs in winter and early spring. The respiratory illness is caused by either the Influenza A or influenza B virus. The flu is highly contagious and is typically spread through physical contact or contact with mucous or respiratory droplets.

While there is treatment available for the flu, it is often only effective if used early in the illness, usually before you are aware of what is causing you to be sick. Knowing the early symptoms of the flu is not only important when seeking treatment, but also important in preventing the spread of the sickness. Some of the early symptoms of the flu include,

  • Fever

    While you may only notice a slight fever at first, this is one of the best ways to distinguish your early symptoms as flu related, instead of related to a cold. As you progress through the illness, you will probably run a high fever and experience chills on and off.

  • Fatigue

    When you have the flu you will often experience fatigue as well as overall weakness. As your body begins to fight the virus, you will find that you will feel better when resting, even though you may still feel fatigued after a good night’s rest.

  • Cough

    Since influenza is a respiratory illness, you will often experience coughing as an early symptom. At the beginning your cough may not be as severe and might not cause as much discomfort. You may dismiss this symptom as being cold related at first.

  • Sore Throat

    At first your throat may just feel dry and itchy, as though you have something caught in it you can’t work up, but eventually your throat will begin to throb and often become red and inflamed.

  • Headaches

    Headaches caused by the flu can be severe and sometimes even incapacitating. This can occur when you are experiencing a fever due to the dilation of your blood vessels, or can be the result of sinus pressure due to congestion.

  • Body Aches

    One of the primary ways you can distinguish the symptoms of a cold from that of the flu is the all over body aches. Muscles can be sore and have a nagging ache that is not relieved with rest. This combined with weakness and fatigue can keep you bed bound throughout your illness.

  • Nasal Congestion

    When you have the flu, you may develop stuffy nasal passages, a runny nose, or both during the duration of your illness. This is usually most severe during the beginning of the flu.

  • Nausea

    Nausea is an early symptom of the flu experienced by some. When you are nauseous during the flu you may find yourself eating less, which will increase the feelings of fatigue and overall body weakness.

  • Diarrhea

    Like nausea not all sufferers will experience diarrhea as an early flu symptom. If you do, it is important to stay hydrated to prevent a possible trip to the hospital.

Recognizing the early symptoms of the flu will not only help you prevent the spread of the disease, but will also help you treat your illness as quickly as possible, resulting in a shorter and hopefully easier duration.

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When Does Flu Activity Begin?

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Influenza Has Two-Thirds Of The Year

Commonly, flu activity for the flu season is going to affect a given community between October and May in the United States. This will vary from region to region. Some will be affected as early as late August, and see a massive tapering off before the end of March. Some won’t see anything severe until the middle of November. Generally, wherever you’re located in the United States, influenza instances peak around the middle of the winter months, between December and February.

Factors Influencing Influenza Epidemics

The yearly flu season really is a kind of epidemic, but its severity and onset have factors that do play a part. One is travel. During the travel times which surround Christmas and New Year, people will travel across the country and bring their viral contact with them without meaning to. During the Summer months, there is a great deal of travel as well. So when kids come back to school, they’ll usually spread viruses around. A child who went out of the country will have a play date with a child who never left their local town. The traveling youngster will accidentally transmit the flu he didn’t know he was carrying to his local friend, who in turn is kind enough to share it with his parents, and they with their coworkers. Because of the length it takes for the symptoms of influenza to manifest, it can take a day or so before someone realizes they’ve caught the virus. During this time, they’re contagious without knowing it. In this way, sicknesses are often transported from other regions on flights. A flight is seldom 24 hours, and is always enclosed in a relatively tight space. Sickness has ample time to spread in such conditions.

Health

One of the biggest factors in the spread of influenza is overall health. When a society has adopted trends that are unhealthy, it can become a breeding ground for sickness. Take smoking, for instance. Smoking can result in a chronic cough coupled to addiction. When a smoker is sick, they don’t quit smoking entirely; they barely curtail their vice. The cough existed before, and comes again after. They may have walking pneumonia for months and have no idea. When such persons become statistic quotients of society, they can make it easy for influenza to spread. The same is true for individuals subsisting on diets that aren’t as healthy as they should be. Proper health gives the body enough strength to support immune system functionality. But when foodstuffs are processed such that the nutritional content wanes into obscurity, the body’s immune system fuel ebbs and so defenses are weakened. Processed sugars, enriched flour, preservative agents, cooking practices and other things combine to reduce nutritional content in many modern foods. When this is coupled with unhealthy lifestyles that aren’t active enough physically, immune systems are weakened, becoming susceptible to influenza.

What To Do

You can take steps to ensure you and those around you are at decreased risk for the contraction of influenza. Steps include:

  • Regular Physical Exercise
  • Nutritionally Balanced (Healthy) Diet (avoid processed foods where possible)
  • Plenty Of Healthy Fluids (alcohol weakens the immune system)
  • Hygiene (regular showers, brushed teeth, washed hands, etc.)
  • Healthy Public Practice (wash hands after touching doorknobs, or use a tissue; etc.)
  • Vaccinations

Vaccinations should be administered when a person is at a healthy point, as the antigens involved produce an immune system response which is basically a miniature version of the illness. It lasts a few days to a few hours, and gives the immune system important information to combat the year’s influenza epidemic.

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When to Call a Doctor – Seasonal Flu

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It Generally Clears Up


Influenza can’t be cured, but if you’re in good health, it’ll usually go away on its own within several days to several weeks. Sometimes influenza can usher in more serious conditions that require medical attention, however. Following are signs that getting past your bout with the flu may require medical assistance.

You Have Trouble Breathing, Or Chest Pain


If you’ve been asthmatic in the past or have a history of heart disease in your family, this could very well be why influenza has brought on the pain. Additionally, pneumonia could have set up residence in your lungs, filling them with fluid. Pneumonia definitely requires additional help from a medical authority. Should you have chest pain in conjunction to regular flu symptoms, it may very well be related to pneumonia or something worse, only a doctor can tell you for sure.

Your Fever Won’t Resolve


In an adult, a fever that’s 100.5 degrees or more (which won’t go away) is something that should be looked at by a doctor. It usually indicates that there is one or more additional infections plaguing your body.

Call A Doctor In Cases Of Influenza Acquired By A Senior


The older a person is, the weaker their immune system. Much past seventy, influenza could quickly snowball into a much worse and life-threatening condition. If you or a loved one contracts the flu at this age, it is very recommendable to see a doctor. Most deaths which are related to influenza happen to those that are extremely old or extremely young. In these times of life, immune systems are weakened. Influenza claims the lives of over 50,000 people every year, and most of them are either really young or really old.

Call A Doctor For Very Young Children Catching The Flu


Under a year, definitely contact your physician should your child contract any illness. The same goes through early childhood, probably until they’re older than five years of age. Immune systems are just developing in children at this age, and while there does eventually manifest a resiliency that surpasses many adult immune systems by the time a child is in their teens, early age often indicates heightened susceptibility to infections like those which come from the influenza virus.

You Can’t Keep Water Down


Your body must have copious amounts of fluid in order to combat influenza. If you drink and then vomit so much that your body can’t process fluids, you need to be hooked up to an IV so you can recover. Not doing so could result in a serious worsening of your condition which may ultimately prove fatal. Don’t panic though; you’ve got about a 24 hour window, here.

Swallowing Hurts


A sore throat is normal, but it shouldn’t hurt to swallow. This is very likely a sign that additional inflaming agencies, possibly a separate viral infection, are affecting you. See a doctor.

Persistent Cough


If it’s been a few weeks and your cough won’t go away this is a sign that the sickness may have moved down into the lungs, giving you a form of walking pneumonia. While walking pneumonia may clear up on its own, it also may not. Contact a physician; it may be that antibiotics clear the problem right up; but since they’ve been over-prescribed, there may be mitigating conditions.

Congestion And Headache Refuse To Leave


This could very likely indicate a sinus infection has transcended your cold, and medical attention is necessary to resolve it in a healthy manner.

Recovery


Influenza usually clears up on its own, except when it doesn’t: then you need a doctor.

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What are Flu Vaccination Alternatives for My Child

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Inoculation Administration Types

There are two primary ways inoculations for the influenza virus are administered.

  • Injection
  • Nasal Spray

While there are also vaccination options available of the oral, ingestible variety, influenza isn’t regularly contracted this way, and such options are less likely to be effective. Additionally, these aren’t widely produced at this time, meaning mainly–unless some medical acuity is in the family’s repertoire–injections and nasal sprays will be your only two choices.

Injections

An injection is everything it sounds like. A needle’s used to push the vaccine directly into the body’s bloodstream, forcing an immune-system response which informs the body of what the virus is, and how to defend against it. The pain is not intense, and it leaves quickly. Additionally, it heals quickly. But if you have inoculated your child when very young, they could have developed an instinctual dislike of the procedure brought on via memory when you take them to get their shot. Some children are more aptly disposed to it than others. There are many times the prospect of the pain is much worse than the pain itself, and a great deal of caterwauling will accompany the trip to the clinic, but when the actual shot comes, the child is so surprised at how minimal the pain is, they’re able to laugh it off. But everyone is different, and knowing your child’s strength or weakness in this area is important. You should have an idea what to expect beforehand for the sake of yourself, your child, and others at the clinic.

Nasal Sprays

While there has been criticism against this form of inoculation, it is proven effective statistically. Whether that remains to be seen is something beyond prediction. Antibiotics are being phased out because their prolific use has facilitated their contemporary ineffectiveness. Could the same happen to nasal sprays? Some think so, some don’t. Regardless, this option is available, and has a plethora of numbers to recommend it. It’s essentially pain free, so there’s no mental or physical discomfort your child may endure. The only downside is the possibility of ineffectiveness over time, as yet that issue is up for discussion.

Natural Inoculation

The only other alternative for inoculation to injections or nasal sprays is exposure to the pathogen in the real world, but in a low enough quantity as to be sustainable to your child’s immune system. Some folk remedies encourage a practice of getting together when the year’s sickness comes to let it pass through everybody and allow them to process its impact initially. This is not a publicly recommendable way of inoculating from an official standpoint, as the amount and severity of the sickness involved can be unpredictable. Meanwhile, inoculations are a dead–or severely weakened–version of the virus which has been standardized for administration in professional facilities. The injected pathogen is taken by the immune system, “mapped”, as it were, and rejected. This facilitates an immune system response that is less severe than that of an actual illness, but is manageable in comparison.

When To Vaccinate

When your child is in peak health, and other children aren’t in the middle of getting vaccinated, it makes sense to get an inoculation. Some inoculation forms include weakened versions of pathogens which may yet be contagious, and inoculating right before the school year, as so many do, could actually help spread the sickness. Additionally, there aren’t going to be as many nasal options available when the rush hits, and your schedule will probably be a little bit more rigid as well. Finally, in Summer, immune systems absorb more Vitamin D, and are so in greater strength.

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