When Does the Flu Turn Deadly

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With the unpredictable flu seasons whereby, some years the flu becomes mild and in other years it becomes very severe, it is always advisable to be on the lookout for any symptoms resembling the flu and noting when they become deadly. The differences in the severity of the flu happen when the flu vaccine available fails to cover the dominant strain of flu circulating in that particular year. Another reason why this happens is that the flu strain could be the severe one and it could either be Influenza A or H3N2.

Those Who Survive & Those Who Don’t

Majority of flu patients experience a few days of body aches, cough, fever, runny rose, chills, sore throat and fatigue that doesn’t seem to end. Both adults and children would prefer some bed rest as they recuperate and this means a few days off work or school. For this kind of patients usually they feel better after resting for a few days. For other people however, both the young and the adults, the flu could be more than just a few days of discomfort and recuperation. It could actually be dangerous and in some cases it has led to death even though it wasn’t the main cause in the first place.

Death From Flu-Related Complications

Usually it starts as a mild cough and later the sore throat, body aches, fever and then the chills begin. Thousands of people die from flu-related complications every year according to Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. It is advisable that anyone who develops symptoms of the flu to seek a doctor’s advice immediately and begin the treatment process. This is actually the best way to prevent the mild infection from escalating. Thanks to modern medicine advancements the Influenza Pandemic of 1918 which killed more than 20 million people worldwide was the last world flu pandemic as much as its cause is still not clearly known.

When The Flu Turns Deadly

Most people have been known to recover from the flu on their own without administering any medications thanks to strong immune systems. But, there is this small percentage of people who have been known to experience complications that further led to death. When does the flu turn deadly? This is what you should look for and act upon.

  • Breathing Problems

When you notice the patient experiencing breathing difficulties and they are actually wheezing, breathing shallow or aren’t able to catch their breath, this should be cause for alarm. In child patients, you will notice them, straining their neck and chest muscles in order to breathe. You will also notice them having a blue tint around their lips and that they are always leaning forward when wheezing and producing this barking cough. Taking the patient for more medical care is recommended in such cases.

  • Fever That Doesn’t Subside

If you have administered ibuprofen, acetaminophen or any other anti-fever medications and the fever doesn’t show any signs of subsiding, then you should be seriously worried because that is a sure sign that the fever is turning deadly.

  • The Patient Refusing Food Or Drink

When the patient refuses to drink or eat anything and clearly shows dehydration signs like sunken eyes, dry mouth and little or no urination, then that right there is a sign that the fever has turned deadly.

  • A Productive Cough

When the cough changes from the dry one to the productive one, which results to phlegm and sometimes vomiting occurring (especially in children), then you need to be worried and take the patient to see the doctor.

An Ear Infection This is often common with children. When you notice the child complaining of pain in their ear and some fluids coming out, then that is a complication that could develop to something serious. It is sign that the fluid is turning deadly and that more strict medical measures should be taken. From the above information it is clear that the flu virus is dangerous. Never wait for the flu to turn deadly in order to seek medical help, see a doctor as soon as you notice the symptoms.

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